DRM Rolling Stock Roster


As of April 4, 1996


RS1 400 Ex-Green Mountain 400, ex-Illinois Central Gulf 1053, ex-Gulf Mobile and Ohio 1053, nee Illinois Terminal 1053 (originally 753). The name "Green Mountain" was painted over with a yellow stripe before shipment to the museum.

Erected in 1948 by Alco (American Locomotive Company) of Schenectady, New York. Bought by the Green Mountain in 1976 and stored in anticipation of passenger service until 1983. Spent several years in seasonal excursion service. Used in freight service as recently as December 1995. Bought by the DRM on December 27, 1995. Delivered to the museum January 19, 1996. Will be used to power excursion trains.

Alco pioneered the concept of the road switcher with the 1000-horsepower, 6-cylinder RS-1. Prior to delivery of the first RS-1 in 1941, all diesel locomotives were built for one kind of service, such as yard switching, road freight, or passenger trains. The RS-1 could perform all three functions. This concept was an immediate hit with many railroads anxious to cut the tremendous expense of running steam locomotives. World War II manufacturing restrictions meant they had to wait several years to take advantage of the flexibility RS-1s and other road switchers offered, but the railroads eventually bought 417 RS-1s between 1941 and 1960. This 19-year production run is by far the longest for any diesel locomotive produced in the United States.

Caboose C-627Caboose C-627 Ex-Berkshire Scenic Railway, ex-Conrail 19846, ex-Penn Central 19846, nee New Haven C-627. Built in May, 1944, by Pullman-Standard as class NE-5. Reconditioned by Conrail in January, 1978. Berkshire Scenic started to paint it but never finished. Consequently, one side is was Berkshire Scenic green and the other was Conrail blue. The caboose has been restored to its as-delivered appearance of red body, black roof, and yellow grab irons, with New Haven spelled out in white.

Cabooses were used to house the conductor and rear end brakeman of the traditional five-man freight train crew. Here the conductor, who was in charge of the train, did his paperwork. From the cupola he observed his train for possible safety problems. Many cabooses were rolling studio apartments complete with kitchens and beds. Until 30 or so years ago, a particular caboose was assigned to a particular conductor. This gave rise to a great sense of ownership and conductors often customized "their" cabooses to make them a home away from home. In the last 15 years, technological advances and changes in railroad work rules have reduced most freight train crews to two people and eliminated almost all cabooses. Instead, flashing rear end devices, or FREDs, are now attached to the last car of most freight trains. Cabooses are used only when a train will have to back across many grade crossings or where it would be very inconvenient for switching purposes to have the conductor aboard the locomotive.


Coach 1547 Ex-Housatonic, ex-SEPTA, nee Reading. Built in 1925 by Bethlehem Steel as PBr, it was possibly among the four cars in this class moderinzed by the Reading in the late 1940's, but has not retained its skirting. It is painted Pullman green and lettered "Reading Company".

Coach 2001 Ex-Housatonic, ex-SEPTA, nee Reading. Built in 1922 by Harlan and Hollingsworth of Wilmington, Delaware, as class PBm. It was modernized in 1948, reclassified PBt, and assigned to the Wall Street. It no longer has skirting, is painted in a darg green and yellow livery, and lettered "Danbury Railway Museum".

Coach 2012 Ex-Housatonic, ex-SEPTA, nee Reading. Built in 1922 by Harlan and Hollingsworth of Wilmington, Delaware, as Class PBm. Bebuilt in 1948 as class PBu. After modernization it seated 44 in a coach section and 10 in a smoking section, and was assigned to the Schuylkill. The interior has been reconfigured into a single section. It no longer has skirting, is painted in a dark green and yellow livery, and is lettered "Danbury Railway Museum".

Coach 2014 Ex-Housatonic, ex-SEPTA, nee Reading. Built in 1922 by Harlan and Hollingsworth of Wilmington, Delaware, as class PBm. Moderenized in 1948 and reclassified PBu. After moderenization it seated 44 in a coach section and 10 in a smoking section and was assigned to the King Coal. The interior has been reconfigured into a single section. It retains its skirting. The exterior has been partially painted Pullman green and lettered "Reading Company".

Coach 2015 The John E. Flower. Ex-Housatonic, ex-SEPTA, nee Reading. Built in 1922 by Harlan and Hollingsworth of Wilmington, Delaware, as class PBm. Rebuilt in 1948 as class PBu. It seated 44 in a coach section and 10 in a smoking section, and was assigned to the King Coal. The interior has been reconfigured into a single section. It no longer has skirting, is painted in a dark green and yellow livery, and is lettered "Danbury Railway Museum". No. 2015 has been named after John E. Flower, late Chairman of the Danbury Railway Museum Board of Directors.

All five coaches are owned by the Connecticut Department of Transportation and are leased to the museum. They were last used by the Housatonic in tourist service on the Berkshire line around Canaan, CT. The coaches were delivered to the museum April 8, 1995. Some or all will be used in excursion service.


RDC 19RDC1 19 ex-Metro-North 19, ex-Amtrak 19, ex-Penn Central 76, nee New Haven 32.

RDC 47RDC1 47 ex-Metro-North 47, ex-Penn Central 47, nee New Haven 47.


Built by Budd Company in Red Lion, Pennsylvania, both Budd cars were delivered in 1953. They served Danbury under the New Haven and Penn Central. No. 19 has been altered from its original appearance with the addition of end diaphrams and raised headlights. Both were donated to the museum by Metro-North. Cosmetic restoration is under way. Mechanical restoration is possible, but is not scheduled at this time. Received June 7, 1995.

As passenger train patronage declined rapidly after World War II, the railroads needed to cut passenger department losses whil maintaining the level of service that government regulators required. Although motor cars had been branded a failure in the past, the Budd Company introduced its stainless steel rail diesel car (RDC) in 1949. They used compact 275 horsepower General Motors diesels originally developed for use in World War II. Two of these power plants with torque converter transmissions were mounted under the floor. Shafts drove the inside axle of each truck. The high power-to-weight ratio insured rapid accelleration. 89 passengers could be carried in air-conditioned comfort. Several northeastern railroads with lightly patronized branch line passenger services became big Budd customers. RDCs were very successful, but inevitably the decline in passenger loadings rendered them obsolete.


CB3001Burro Crane CB3004 ex-Metro-North, ex-Conrail, ex-Penn Central, nee New York Central. Previous numbers unknown at this time. Painted yellow and stenciled Danbury Railway Museum.

CB3004Burro Crane CB3001 ex-Metro-North, ex-?. Suspected to be of the same heritage as CB3004. Painted yellow and stenciled Danbury Railway Museum.


No. CB3004 (serial number 30-237) was ordered by the NYC on January 29, 1946. It was delivered to Brewster, NY, supervisor of track N. A. Frederickson of February 15, 1947. The orginal 6-cylinder Waukesha gas engine has since been replaced with a 3-cylinder Detroit Diesel. CB3004 was delivered with Burro anti-slip rail tongs, a model 58 clamshell, and an Ohio MT 36, 36-inch 230-volt electromagnet. None of these accessories have passed to the museum.

The Burro Cranes were donated by Metro-North. CB3001 arrived October 11, 1995; CB3004 arrived October 24, 1995. Work is underway to restore one crane to operating condition.


GondolaGondola 60321 Ex-Housatonic, ex-Conrail, ex-Penn Central, nee New Haven. Currently in as-received condition (a thick coat of rust with the New Haven lettering faintly visible).

A surprise donation by the Housatonic when they delivered the coaches. The 60000 series gons were built in 1929-30 by the New Haven shops as 40-foot gons with four drop doors. Most were rebuilt into the 61000 series without the drop doors in the 50s. Ours escaped somehow, and was the last 60000 series gon in service. The Housatonic welded a snow plow to one end and used it to keep their line open in winter. The plow was removed before delivery to the museum. Received April 8, 1995. Cosmetic restoration is planned for some future date.

Gondolas such as this were used to carry low-value commodities that could not be harmed by the weather, such as scrap metal. Drop doors were useful for unloading coal or ballast from an open trestle into a storage area.


Except where noted, photos on this page are by Rick Simpson.

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ROS Last modified: Wed Mar 5 22:25:38 1997